Blue Mountains News

How Did The Lucas Cave Get Its Name?

Source: Jenolan Caves Reserve Trust
Archived 11 Dec 2018 - Posted: 14 Oct 2018
Lucas Cave
The mighty Lucas Cave is usually the first of Jenolan's many caves that visitors come to see. Generations of school children remember the Lucas Cave from their school excursion to Jenolan. It is definitely the best known of all Jenolan's caves, humbling visitors by its magnitude.

The Lucas Cave is incredibly spectacular, featuring Jenolan's highest chamber, the 'Cathedral', which is approx 54 metres high, and also Jenolan's widest chamber, the 'Exhibition', which is the size of a small football field.

The Lucas is famous for mind-boggling calcite crystal formations, such as the 'Broken Column', which are massive rather than pretty.  But you also see some beautiful cave shawls. 

If your tour group is small and your guide has time, he or she may take you into the 'Mafeking Branch', which is one of the most beautiful sections of the whole Jenolan system. (To have a chance of seeing the Mafeking Branch, come to Jenolan at a quiet time of year, such as November and December prior to Christmas.) The Lucas Cave even gives you a tantalising glimpse of the pure, blue underground river. 

The Lucas cave was found in 1860 by George Whiting and Nicholas Irwin. It was one of the first few caves to be discovered at Jenolan and was originally called, simply, the New Cave.  If this cave had been discovered in recent years, it probably would have been glorified with a name that  reflects its majestic proportions. However, it was renamed The Lucas Cave, after a politician!  MP John Lucas, was passionate about the caves and worked tirelessly to protect them.  His work resulted in the whole cave system, and surrounding region, being declared a reserve in 1866, making it one of the very earliest places in Australia to come under government protection.  It was a major achievement.

This article appeared in the October 2018 Jenolan Caves email newsletter and has been republished here with permission.

 
Springwood Florist Springwood Florist Springwood Florist Your First Choice for Flowers

Recent News

Blue Mountains Historical Society’s 19th Century Cottage Museum Tarella Open Day
Blue Mountains Historical Society’s 19th Century Cottage Museum Tarella Open Day
On Sunday 28 April, 2019, the Blue Mountains Historical Society’s 19th...
Winter Warmers for Cool Yule
Winter Warmers for Cool Yule
Bon bons and plum pud among myriad teapots, belly laughs at classic humour,...
Aine Tyrrell + Smith & Jones Live in Concert at the 1930's Metropole Guesthouse
Aine Tyrrell + Smith & Jones Live in Concert at the 1930's Metropole Guesthouse
"Tyrrell's incredible journey is one you'd be well advised to follow…...
Farmers Creek Environmental Works
Farmers Creek Environmental Works
Significant rehabilitation works are underway along Farmers Creek to achieve...

What's New

OPEN Little Wombat Gallery
OPEN Little Wombat Gallery
Little Wombat Gallery and Roslyn Elms Images We are OPEN this Friday 26 and Saturday 27 March 10am - 4 pm CLOSED Sunday
2019 National Trust Heritage Festival
2019 National Trust Heritage Festival
Botanical Theatre Studio, Gallery & Garden Enjoy autumn in the Artist's garden. Book tix via www.botanicaltheatre.com.au
Conveyancing Made Easy
Conveyancing Made Easy
Think Conveyancing Blue Mountains A conveyancing-only law firm, where top priority is to maximise your savings while minimising your legal risk. Call now
***JUNE SPECIAL OFFER***
***JUNE SPECIAL OFFER***
Hills Havens BOOK Fri and Sat nights and receive late check out of 3PM Sunday...subject to SUNDAY night NOT booked by others.
The most unique cottage in the Mountains
The most unique cottage in the Mountains
The Mouse House Suitable for groups of 8 people. Echo Point, Three Sisters, and Scenic Railway all within walking distance.
Also in this Section

Have You Visited

Announcement
Edith School House Unique AccommodationThis is the perfect getaway for some fresh crisp clean air to Oberon Jenolan Caves Waldara Mayfield and lots moreView Edith School House »